The evolution of MSP started in the 1990s with the emergence of application service providers (ASPs) who helped pave the way for remote support for IT infrastructure. From the initial focus of remote monitoring and management of servers and networks, the scope of an MSP's services expanded to include mobile device management, managed security, remote firewall administration and security-as-a-service, and managed print services. Around 2005, Karl W. Palachuk, Amy Luby (Founder of Managed Service Provider Services Network acquired by High Street Technology Ventures), and Erick Simpson (Managed Services Provider University) were the first advocates and the pioneers of the managed services business model.[16][17]

Now more than ever, leading MSPs are re-engineering their cybersecurity offerings. "The new normal has begun, and the line in the sand of minimum cybersecurity requirements have changed for the SMB," says Andrew Morgan, host of the CyberCall, a free online community of 2,000 security-focused MSPs. "We're leading the charge for all MSPs, helping them understand that what they were doing for security in the past is no longer sufficient. And explaining this to their clients is a core competency that all MSPs must have in order to survive."

Morgan explains that help for all SMBs is on the way. "The CyberCall has been a tremendous catalyst for the entire industry. We've already had leaders from the Center for Internet Security, Global Cyber Alliance, and others join our call. They understand that the only way the SMB sector can truly be secured is by way of the MSP. They are focused on bringing the resources, attention, and help that all MSPs and their SMB clients need in these wild times."

Creative People provides IT support for a tax law firm. The client needed IT support; Creative People helped them update their hardware, and they have been helping the client with their website. Additionally, they work with the client’s video conferencing system, access control system, and their legal CRM. The client has been satisfied with the company’s work, and wants to continue working with them. 

However, as time progressed computer manufacturing grew to large scale, leaving the small IT dealer to focus less on manufacturing and more on break/fix. This system was time consuming, labor intensive, costly and reactive. It did not allow the technician room to grow their business or take on new clients without massive investments in labor and infrastructure.

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